Drakkar Press

20 Moorside Road, Brookhouse, Lancaster, England, LA2 9PJ
johnselfdrakkar@gmail.com

Drakkar Press was set up in 2005 as a means of publishing my miscellaneous scribblings.  It exists only in the imagination of the major bookshops and distributors.  They insist that a book be ‘published’ by such an entity before the book itself can be deemed to exist.

At first, books were published in the conventional sense, that is, they were printed and sold through distributors and bookshops.

Whoever Said Computers Would Be Intelligent? (2005) is a 280-page review of the subject of artificial intelligence, woven from over 500 quotations, both pertinent and impertinent.  

The Land of the Lune (first edition, 2008) is a 260-page guide (including over 200 photographs) to the region within the Lune watershed. 

Later, since the scribblings were for amusement (my own and any readers) and not for profit and certainly not for all the hassle of dealing with distributors and bookshops, both the above books were made freely available on the web.

 

            The on-line Whoever Said Computers Would Be Intelligent? is virtually the same as the printed version.

The on-line The Land of the Lune (second edition, 2010) is a revised and expanded version of the first edition.

Subsequently, the following documents have been placed on-line:

Fifty Weeks Running: Ruminations of a Rusty Runner (2011) is a sort of on-line diary reflecting on running (and other things) based on experiences of running around the region and elsewhere for thirty years, on and off. 

Rainy Day Rambles in the Lake District (2015) is a set of ‘sketches’ about the Lake District.

The Wildlife of the Lune Region (2013 - 2016) describes a series of explorations of the wildlife of the region within the Lune catchment.

Computational Mathetics: Towards a Science of Learning Systems Design (1995) was placed on-line in 2016, to celebrate its 21st birthday. 

Visitors to an Australian Garden (2017) by Dagmar Parer, a friend who sadly died in 2014. This document describes the wildlife that visited her garden in Wallaroo, near Canberra. 

 

John Self